VICTOR DE LORENZO: synthetic biology, an overview

The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO)/iBiology synthetic biology course is a series of talks about synthetic biology, covering general principles, technical challenges, current research, and ethical issues in synthetic biology research. This course is based on the EMBO Synthetic Biology in Action Course, which was held at the European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany over two weeks in June 2015.

Timothy Lu: An Emerging Engineering Discipline

In his iBiology talk, Dr. Timothy Lu describes how biological circuits, using principles from engineering, can be used as digital (all or none) or analog (continuous spectrum) sensors, and can be programmed in a cell to 'remember' an input and pass this memory to the cell's offspring after it divides.

 

Eriko Takano: Production of Novel Antibiotics

Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide. To address this problem, Eriko Takano and her colleagues are developing methods to produce novel antibiotics using a synthetic biology approach. By performing genome analysis on many microbes, they can identify genes encoding novel biosynthesis pathways that may produce antibiotics.

JAN ROELOF VAN DER MEER: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS

Dr. van der Meer begins by giving a very nice outline of what synthetic biology is. He explains that DNA and protein "parts" can be put together to form biological circuits in a manner analogous to making electrical circuits from transformers, capacitors and the like.

 

Jay Keasling: Engineering Microbes to Solve Global Challenges

Dr. Jay Keasling discusses the promise of biological systems to create carbon-neutral products for a range of applications, including fuels, chemicals and drugs. Dr. Keasling discusses the application of these principles to the development of a microbial platform for the synthesis of artemisinic acid, which has helped stabilize global supply of this anti-malarial drug.

 

Wendell Lim: Building cell signaling networks

Dr. Lim explains that many signaling proteins are built from simple modules arranged in different ways. Some modules are catalytic and transmit information (for instance kinase or phosphatase domains) while others are interaction modules that regulate information flow (for example protein-protein interaction domains).

Christopher Voigt : Programming Living Bacteria

For synthetic biologists to engineer cells that can make complex chemicals or perform complex functions, they must be able to tell the cell which genes to turn on and at what time. To do this they build genetic circuits composed of a series of gates that respond to a specific input with a specific output.

 

Jens Nielsen: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology of Yeast

http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/metabolic-engineering-and-synthetic-biology-of-yeast.html Dr. Jens Nielsen introduces the idea that cells can act as microbial factories for the sustainable production of diverse products. Dr. Nielsen explains that the goal of metabolic engineering is to alter a cell's metabolism to produce a desired product.


JUAN ENRIQUEZ: USING BIOLOGY TO RETHINK THE ENERGY CHALLENGE

Juan Enriquez challenges our definition of bioenergy. Oil, coal, gas and other hydrocarbons are not chemical but biological products, based on plant matter -- and thus, growable. Our whole approach to fuel, he argues, needs to change.

 

CRAIG VENTER: ON THE VERGE OF CREATING SYNTHETIC LIFE

"Can we create new life out of our digital universe?" asks Craig Venter. And his answer is, yes, and pretty soon. He walks the TED2008 audience through his latest research into "fourth-generation fuels" -- biologically created fuels with CO2 as their feedstock.

 

LISA NIP: SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IN SPACE

Molecular and synthetic biology have made better tools for the understanding of our bodies, the treatment of human diseases, the production of our food sources, and the engineering of life on Earth. How can we transform and implement these methods in the preparation for our species's necessary voyage to space within and beyond our solar system?

 

Craig Venter: future biology

J. Craig Venter is a biologist most known for his contributions, in 2001, of sequencing the first draft human genome and in 2007 for the first complete diploid human genome. In 2010 he and his team announced success in constructing the first synthetic bacterial cell.

SUZANNE LEE: GROW YOUR OWN CLOTHES                                         

Designer Suzanne Lee shares her experiments in growing a kombucha-based material that can be used like fabric or vegetable leather to make clothing. The process is fascinating, the results are beautiful (though there's still one minor drawback ...) and the potential is simply stunning.

 

BIRGER LINDBERG MØLLER: PLANT POWER--THE ULTIMATE WAY TO GO GREEN

Synthetic biology is a new movement setting the hearts and minds of scientists across the world on fire. But really plants, and not scientists, are at the center of this movement: They can help us think completely out-of-the-box for solutions to the challenges we as a global community are facing in the move to a biobased society.
 

Xavier Duportet: Ingredients for a vibrant tech-entrepreneurship ecosystem

Creating a vibrant tech-entrepreneurship ecosystem: when superheroes swap their cape for a lab coat A 25 ans, Xavier Duportet est un architecte des génomes. Ingénieur AgroParisTech, il est actuellement doctorant en biologie synthétique à l'INRIA (Paris) et au MIT (Boston) - école doctorale Frontières du Vivant.

STEWARD BRAND: THE DAWN OF DE-EXTINCTION. ARE YOU READY ?

Throughout humankind's history, we've driven species after species extinct: the passenger pigeon, the Eastern mountain lion, the dodo .... But now, says Stewart Brand, we have the technology (and the biology) to bring back species that humanity wiped out. So -- should we? Which ones?
 

DREW ENDY: SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY--WHAT SHOULD WE BE VIBRATING ABOUT?

Drew Endy is an associate professor of bioengineering and member of the faculty of the Center for International Security and Cooperation. Drew Endy helped start the newest engineering major, bioengineering, at both the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford.
 

Neri Oxman: design at the intersection of technology and biology

Designer and architect Neri Oxman is leading the search for ways in which digital fabrication technologies can interact with the biological world. Working at the intersection of computational design, additive manufacturing, materials engineering and synthetic biology, her lab is pioneering a new age of symbiosis between microorganisms, our bodies, our products and even our buildings.